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Central America

Coffee crisis in Central America fuels record exodus north (Maytaal Angel and Gustavo Palencia, Sofia Menchu, Reuters)

The four sons of María Bonilla and Esteban Funes all embarked on the treacherous journey north, one of them aged 10, preferring the life of an unauthorized migrant in America to a coffee farmer in Central America.

Coffee crisis in Central America fuels record exodus north | Reuters

Categorie
Central America

Fighting the autocratic slide in Central America (Charles T. Call, Brookings)

After decades of difficult and uneven progress, democracy in Central America is experiencing its worst crisis since the militarized authoritarianism of the 1970s. Indeed, none of the presidents of Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, or Nicaragua is invited to the Biden administration’s Summit for Democracy.

Fighting the autocratic slide in Central America (brookings.edu)

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Central America

A Central American missile crisis? (Christopher J. Hunter, Defense News)

Late Saturday evening, Oct. 16, China’s successful August test of a nuclear-capable hypersonic missile was publicly reported for the first time by the “Financial Times,” a ”capability that caught US intelligence by surprise,” according to “Financial Times” sources.

Fifty-nine years earlier, on Oct. 16, 1962, the Soviet Union’s forward deployment of nuclear capable ballistic missiles in Cuba also caught the United States by surprise.

A Central American missile crisis? (defensenews.com)

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Central America Mexico USA

Secretary Blinken’s Meeting with Mexican Foreign Secretary and Central American Foreign Ministers (US Department of State)

The below is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price:

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken and USAID Administrator Samantha Power met yesterday with Mexican Foreign Secretary Marcelo Ebrard, Foreign Ministers Eamon Courtenay of Belize, Rodolfo Solano of Costa Rica, Pedro Brolo of Guatemala, Erika Mouynes of Panama, and Vice Foreign Minister Jose Isaias Barahona of Honduras, and Permanent Representative to the United Nations Egriselda Lopez of El Salvador on the margins of this week’s United Nations General Assembly meetings in New York City.

Secretary Blinken and his counterparts discussed shared priorities in the region, including collaboratively addressing the challenges of irregular migration, confronting corruption, and building our economies back stronger in the wake of COVID-19.

Secretary Blinken focused on advancing joint efforts to respond to the region’s migration challenge, including addressing the root causes of irregular migration and more effectively managing migration flows in and through Central and North America. The Secretary noted that the United States prioritizes the fight against corruption and impunity, and he strongly encouraged leaders to fortify democratic institutions and the rule of law, which will open more doors to foreign investment and generate more economic opportunities for the people of the region. He also urged regional partners to support the Nicaraguan people in the midst of the Ortega-Murillo government’s wave of political repression and human rights abuses. On the economic front, Secretary Blinken detailed U.S. plans to help the region’s countries fight the COVID-19 pandemic and “Build Back Better” through inclusive economic growth and increased foreign investment.