Categorie
ISIS South Asia Taliban

What the Taliban–IS rivalry means for South Asia (Kabir Taneja, ORF)

Afghanistan has vacated the front pages of the global news cycle as the Taliban consolidates its hold on the country after 20 years of war. However, the crisis points in the State and the conflicts that surround it are evolving in a fast-paced and erratic manner, highlighting developing challenges from the perspective of terrorism in South Asia. From a political point of view, the Taliban, an Islamist insurgency, is now responsible for statecraft, security, and bizarrely, counterterrorism.

The steady rise of the Islamic State Khorasan Province (ISKP), the Islamic State (IS)’s Afghan affiliate in Afghanistan, around the narrative of victory of the Taliban was not entirely unexpected. Throughout the process of the Doha negotiations, which culminated with the United States (US)-Taliban exit deal (February 2020), the IS ecosystem and its online propaganda machinery continuously chided the Taliban for aligning with the US, and by association losing any upper hand in being leaders of the jihad against the enemy (the US, the West). It is interesting to note that the IS’s pushback against the Taliban’s posturing viz-a-viz the US is not exclusive or a first-time event, challenging the West.

What the Taliban–IS rivalry means for South Asia  | ORF (orfonline.org)

Categorie
South Asia

The Status and Potential of Regional Conflicts in South Asia (Muhammad Athar Javed, Valdai Discussion Club)

Intensifying economic and strategic competition, between China and the United States on the one hand and India-China on the other, has pushed all of South Asia to the verge of permanent instability, especially in the wake of the US/NATO withdrawal from Afghanistan.

The Status and Potential of Regional Conflicts in South Asia — Valdai Club

Categorie
India South Asia

India is struggling to keep its financial promises to South Asia (Kazi Mohammad Jamshed, East Asia Forum)

In 2010, India promised to finance US$7.36 billion in development projects in Bangladesh through lines of credit (LOC). So far, only 10.57 per cent of the total funds committed have been disbursed. Although the ‘Neighbourhood First’ policy and Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s ‘Everyone Together, Everyone’s Development, Everyone’s Trust’ vision are integral components of its foreign policy, India is struggling to keep its promises. Will this over-promise but under-delivery of funds have an adverse impact on the relations between India and its LOC partners?

India is struggling to keep its financial promises to South Asia (eastasiaforum.org)