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Geostrategic thinking Pensiero geostrategico

Charter cities for the refugees ?

The “complex” reflection of the Brookings think tank entitled Build cities, not camps: A proposal for addressing refugee crises invites us to deep reflections.

The analysis focuses on the possibility of building “charter cities” to accommodate a number of refugees which, according to the data, is destined to increase. Michael Lokshin and Jan-Peter Olters write: In recent decades, as risks of fragility, conflict, violence, climate change, and famine have soared, the number of people fleeing their homes and seeking refuge has risen to 27 million. By 2050, it is projected to quadruple. A significant share of current migrants — and an even larger share of future climate change refugees — will not return to their home countries.

These data tell us that we are inside a structural phenomenon and whose political government will make a geostrategic difference in the coming decades. It is no longer just a question of welcome (yes / no). It is clear that we all want legal and regulated immigration but the issue is highly complex and is characterized by growing complexity.

The prospect of “charter cities” is interesting because it confronts us with the possible solution of a double problem: how to guarantee a dignified life for refugees? how to adequately address the refugee problem from a systemic point of view?

Brookings proposes to establish sustainable charter cities-in-exile (SCCEs) as a policy framework for host countries and international development organizations to promote refugees’ self-reliance and facilitate their integration.

It seems to us a viable prospect for a phenomenon that, politically, has been reduced to an invasion and a threat. Without changing perspective, politics will continue to deny the structural nature of the phenomenon and only aggravates its consequences.

Italian version

La riflessione “complessa” del think tank Brookings dal titolo Build cities, not camps: A proposal for addressing refugee crises ci invita a profonde riflessioni.

L’analisi si concentra sulla possibilità di costruire “charter cities” per accogliere un numero di rifugiati che, secondo i dati, è destinato ad aumentare. Scrivono Michael Lokshin and Jan-Peter Olters: In recent decades, as risks of fragility, conflict, violence, climate change, and famine have soared, the number of people fleeing their homes and seeking refuge has risen to 27 million. By 2050, it is projected to quadruple. A significant share of current migrants—and an even larger share of future climate change refugees—will not return to their home countries.

Questi dati ci dicono che siamo dentro a un fenomeno strutturale e il cui governo politico farà la differenza geostrategica nei prossimi decenni. Non è più solo questione di accoglienza (si/no). E’ chiaro che tutti vorremmo un’immigrazione legale e regolata ma il tema è grandemente complesso e si caratterizza per una complessità crescente.

La prospettiva delle “charter cities” è interessante perché ci pone di fronte alla soluzione possibile di un doppio problema: come garantire una vita dignitosa ai rifugiati ?; come affrontare adeguatamente il problema dei rifugiati dal punto di vista sistemico ?

Brookings propone to establish sustainable charter cities-in-exile (SCCEs) as a policy framework for host countries and international development organizations to promote refugees’ self-reliance and facilitate their integration.

Ci sembra una prospettiva percorribile per un fenomeno che, politicamente, è stato ridotto a un’invasione e a una minaccia. Senza cambiare prospettiva, la politica continuerà a negare la strutturalità del fenomeno e non fa che aggravarne le conseguenze.