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Cyber Security, Digital Transition, Technology Geopolitics & Worlds In-Defense In-Security Pensiero Strategico

Open newsletter – April 5, 2022 a.m.

COMPLESSITA’, SCENARI, RISCHIO

Troppi soffiano sul fuoco della guerra in Ucraina. Ed è un gioco pericoloso. Le discussioni si accendono, quasi fossero un’altra guerra. Ebbene, lasciando stare le storie fantastiche evocate da alcuni antagonisti che evocano fiction, la domanda di oggi è, per quanto semplice, drammatica: è il caso di evocare un processo per crimini di guerra contro Vladimir Putin ? Ed è giusto che a farlo sia il Presidente degli Stati Uniti ? Sulla seconda credo che, durante una guerra, gli uomini di Stato debbano astenersi dal linguaggio umorale, a meno che non abbiano altri interessi. Sulla prima domanda ci poniamo, come risposta, un’altra domanda: si può pensare che il Presidente russo possa, se incriminato per crimini di guerra, fare passi verso la pace ? Ai sacerdoti della linearità l’ardua sentenza. 

Alcuni passaggi interessanti:

  • è stato lanciato, ad Ankara, lo U.S.-Turkey Strategic Mechanism (United States Department of State
  • Partnership tra USA e Lettonia nell’ambito del programma Foundational Infrastructure for Responsible Use of Small Modular Reactor Technology (FIRST) (United States Department of State)
  • Carnegie Middle East Center riflette sull’importanza del confine turco-siriano: “The Turkish-Syrian border is divided into separate areas of control—under the Syrian Democratic Forces in northeast Syria, Hay’at Tahrir al-Sham in Idlib, and Turkey in several cantons—which sustain contradictory political projects. Yet these border areas constitute a single political-security ecosystem, one connected to southern Turkey and regime-held Syria. As such, only a peace agreement that treats the border areas as an indivisible whole and delimits the major powers’ zones of influence can lead to a stable long-term arrangement”.
  • il lento parlare di pace nello Yemen (AGSIW)

(di Marco Emanuele)

 

TODAY:

  • AROUND THE WORLD
  • DEFENSE – MILITARY – SPACE – CYBER SECURITY
  • ON LIFE
  • RUSSIA – UKRAINE (impact, reactions, consequences)

 

AROUND THE WORLD

Europe

  • How the EU Can Unlock the Private Sector’s Human-Mobility Data for Social Good, March 28. By , Center for Data Innovation. Many businesses routinely collect data about the location of consumers, such as where they are when they make a purchase or use a mobile app. Aggregating this information reveals useful insights about human mobility and social interaction. Researchers, governments, and others can use this mobility data, while respecting user privacy, to study and address many pressing societal challenges, such as disease spread, urban functioning, forced migration, climate change, and disaster response. To support these types of applications, EU policymakers should encourage businesses to share mobility data by implementing policies that provide firms with regulatory clarity, financial incentives, and technical resources to give out this type of data. (read more)

Turkey – Syria

  • Border Nation: The Reshaping of the Syrian-Turkish Borderlands, March 30. By Armenak Tokmajyan, Kheder Khaddour, Carnegie Middle East Center. The Turkish-Syrian border is divided into separate areas of control—under the Syrian Democratic Forces in northeast Syria, Hay’at Tahrir al-Sham in Idlib, and Turkey in several cantons—which sustain contradictory political projects. Yet these border areas constitute a single political-security ecosystem, one connected to southern Turkey and regime-held Syria. As such, only a peace agreement that treats the border areas as an indivisible whole and delimits the major powers’ zones of influence can lead to a stable long-term arrangement. (read more)

USA

USA – Latvia

USA – Turkey

World Government Summit – Dubai

Yemen

DEFENSE – MILITARY – SPACE – CYBER SECURITY

ON LIFE

  • Your Data Isn’t Gold; It’s Not Even Yours, April 1. By David Moschella, ITIF. We hear it so often that it’s easy to assume it must be true. “Our data is gold, and we should be compensated for it.” These two statements basically tell consumers that they are being taken advantage of, even ripped off by Big Tech. Not surprisingly, this has led to resentment and calls for action. But there is just one problem: Both assertions are much more wrong than right. Today’s leading technology companies are extraordinarily profitable, but this is far more due to the unique features of information economics than any data ownership or usage abuses. (read more)

RUSSIA – UKRAINE (reactions, impact, consequences)

  • How the Ukraine war is affecting oil and gas markets, April 4. By Samantha Gross and David Dollar, Brookings. Samantha Gross, director of the Energy Security and Climate Initiative at Brookings, talks with host David Dollar about the Ukraine war’s impact on energy prices. Gross explains the impact Russia’s war on Ukraine is having on natural gas supplies and prices, oil markets, and whether the U.S. should increase natural gas exports to Europe. (read more)
  • China Should Heed Lessons from Russia’s Ukraine Invasion, US Official Says, April 4. By Caitlin M. Kenney, Defense One. Russia’s poorly executed invasion of Ukraine and the international community’s economic and diplomatic response are cautionary lessons for China and others who may want to attempt aggressive actions in the Pacific, the Pentagon’s policy chief for the region said Monday. (read more)
  • Missing in Action: Russian Cyberattacks, April 4. By  Nadiya Kostyuk and Erik Gartzke, Defense One. Throughout the latter half of 2021, as it became clear that Russia was massing a large portion of its conventional combat power on the eastern borders of Ukraine, analysts offered contrasting predictions about the role cyberspace would play in an armed conflict. These predictions capture an ongoing debate about whether conflict in cyberspace is destined to supplant conventional conflict or exacerbate it. (read more)
  • Europeans weigh scope of security guarantees for Ukraine, April 4. By Sebastian Sprenger, Defense News. European governments are expected to discuss their part in security guarantees that could be promised to Ukraine under a potential peace deal following Russia’s increasingly brutal attack on the country, according to a senior European Union official. The comments come as talks between Ukrainian and Russian negotiators last week teed up the question of alternative assurances — outside of NATO’s Article 5 mutual-assistance clause — the West is willing to underwrite after Moscow stops its assault. (read more)