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Arctic. Holding Hope and Grieving Loss in the New Normal of Arctic Climate Change (Victoria Herrmann, Arctic Institute)

White smoke coming from orange burning fires and landscape with small lakes

Wildfire in the Sakha Republic, within the Arctic Circle, Russia (Lat: 69.21915, Lng: 149.95995) – June 23rd, 2020. Photo: Pierre Markuse

When I first began studying climate change a decade ago, I was told that the front lines of those changes were in the Arctic. The region was undergoing an “unprecedented transition in human history” and experiencing some of the most dramatic impacts on the planet. And so, I became an Arctic researcher, traveling across the region to understand the depth of what stood to be lost – and advocate for equitable, courageous action to avert the worst impacts of the climate crisis.

Holding Hope and Grieving Loss in the New Normal of Arctic Climate Change | The Arctic Institute

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Canadian Arctic. Deregulate and Empower Indigenous Language Teachers (Killulark Arngna’naaq, Arctic Institute)

Sunset on water with rocks and mountain

Indigenous language revitalization across Arctic Canada can be supported through a change in tax policy at the federal level. Photo: The Gordon Foundation

Approaches to supporting Indigenous language revitalization in the North at the Federal level is currently inappropriate, as it requires teachers and learners to distort their work and administrative structures to adapt to what governmental regulations perceive to be the most appropriate methodology for language work. This dilutes the capacity of entities completing actual language work. It is necessary to adapt the framework of ways that language revitalization work can be supported for widespread impact, allowing languages to flourish and expand in ways that our leaders envision and suggest. My focus in this analysis is on federal level work, as northern languages are not defined by jurisdictional boundaries, however, Inuit Nunangat in the political boundaries of Canada spans three territories and two provinces, each with varying regulations and support.

Deregulate and Empower Indigenous Language Teachers | The Arctic Institute

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Canadian Arctic. Collaborative Approaches for Wild Plants and Harvests in Whitehorse (Kelly Panchyshyn, Arctic Institute)

Light blue berries in a bush with green needles

As the first university in the Canadian Arctic, Yukon University must root its policies in language, community, and legends. Photo: The Gordon Foundation

For the Whitehorse community, wild plant harvest is an important cultural practice, as well as a means of subsistence and source of recreation. However, this practice is under threat. Development, environmental damage and unsustainable harvest have limited the community’s access to safe and convenient harvest areas. One way to address this issue is through collaborative land-use planning among municipal and First Nations governments.

Collaborative Approaches for Wild Plants and Harvests in Whitehorse | The Arctic Institute

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India/Arctic Policy – The Contours of India’s Arctic Policy (Arctic Institute)

writes: The Arctic has recently assumed considerable strategic significance as it has been underlined by the policies of major powers. The interests and concerns of the Arctic states are vast and varied. India, being an observer in the Arctic Council, has legitimate interests in the region and has created its own Arctic policy. India’s Arctic policy, notified as a draft document in early January 2021, continues along the lines of the country’s science diplomacy

go to Arctic Institute: The Contours of India’s Arctic Policy | The Arctic Institute