Categorie
Australia France USA

US deal with Australia shows continuation of ‘American first’ course, says French ministry (TASS)

The US’ approach to the deal with Australia on submarines highlights that the new Washington’s administration still sticks to the principle ‘America first’, French Secretary of State for European Affairs Clement Beaune said in an interview broadcast by the parliamentary TV channel Public Senat on Saturday.

“Washington protects its interests. The deal highlights that the principle ‘America first’ remains in force,” he said.

“The US acts not as partners, but we are not going to wait for Washington to change its course. We from our side should be acting as Europeans,” minister of state for European affairs noted. “We should fortify our ability for the strategic autonomy,” he said, adding that “the Europeans should strengthen their ability to respond, strive for autonomy in the field of defense strategy.”

On September 15, Australia, the United Kingdom and the United States announced the formation of a new security partnership to be known as AUKUS. Australia particularly plans to use US and British technologies to build at least eight nuclear-powered submarines, the first of which will become operational in 2036, as well as to re-equip its armed forces with US-made cruise missiles. Canberra’s plan breaks an earlier defense contract inked with France, the biggest in Australia’s history. Paris has slammed the move as “a stab in the back.”

Amid the submarines deal France has immediately recalled for consultations its ambassadors from the United States and Australia.
Categorie
Australia China

China’s Xi warns of ‘interference’ as Australia brushes off anger (Al Jazeera)

Australia's Prime Minister Morrison said that the country's defence spending will rise as the new alliance with the US and UK also requires greater investment in cyber capabilities, artificial intelligence, quantum technologies and undersea capabilities [File: Loren Elliott/Reuters]

Australia’s Prime Minister Morrison said that the country’s defence spending will rise as the new alliance with the US and UK also requires greater investment in cyber capabilities, artificial intelligence, quantum technologies and undersea capabilities [File: Loren Elliott/Reuters]

Chinese President Xi Jinping has warned against “interference from external forces” in the region, as Australia shrugged off Beijing’s growing anger about its decision to acquire US nuclear-powered submarines, and promised to defend the rule of law in airspace and waters where China has staked hotly contested claims.

In an address before the Shanghai Cooperation Organization (SCO) on Friday, Xi urged heads of state to “absolutely resist external forces to interfere [in] countries in our region at any excuse, and hold the future of our countries’ development and progress firmly in our own hands”.

China’s Xi warns of ‘interference’ as Australia brushes off anger | South China Sea News | Al Jazeera

Categorie
Australia USA

Deputy Secretary Sherman’s Meeting with Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade Secretary Campbell (US Department of State)

The below is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price:

Deputy Secretary of State Wendy R. Sherman met with Australian Secretary of the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT) Kathryn J. Campbell today in Washington, D.C. The Deputy Secretary and DFAT Secretary highlighted the enduring nature of the U.S.-Australia partnership, our shared values of democracy and respect for human rights, and our cooperation on COVID-19. They discussed economic recovery and resilience in the Indo-Pacific region and pandemic preparedness, as well as Australia’s resistance to PRC economic coercion. Deputy Secretary Sherman and DFAT Secretary Campbell reiterated their support for the international rules-based order and emphasized the importance of holding the Taliban accountable to their commitment to build an inclusive society, allow humanitarian access, and permit the orderly and safe departure of Afghans and other nationals.

Categorie
Defense

Australia says more US troops to come, plans missile project (Al Jazeera)

Australian Defence Minister Peter Dutton, who is visiting the US, said on Thursday that Australia will also be 'significantly enhancing' cooperation with the US on the development of missiles and explosive ordnance [File: Peter Parks/AFP]

Australian Defence Minister Peter Dutton, who is visiting the US, said on Thursday that Australia will also be ‘significantly enhancing’ cooperation with the US on the development of missiles and explosive ordnance [File: Peter Parks/AFP]

Australia has announced that more US troops will rotate through the island nation and that the allies will cooperate on missile development, the latest joint steps amid shared concerns about China’s increasing assertiveness in the region.

Australia earlier announced a three-way alliance with the United States and Britain in which Canberra will acquire nuclear-powered submarines, enraging France whose own key contract for conventional submarines was scrapped.

Australia says more US troops to come, plans missile project | Military News | Al Jazeera

Categorie
Australia/China/USA

Will Biden Keep His Promise to Australia and Keep China in Check? (John Lee, Hudson Institute)

When Australia’s Foreign Minister Marise Payne and Defence Minister Peter Dutton arrive in Washington this Thursday to meet with their American counterparts for the annual bilateral talks known as AUSMIN, China will loom larger than ever.

Will Biden Keep His Promise to Australia and Keep China in Check? – by John Lee (hudson.org)

Categorie
Australia/USA

Australia’s path for reopening to the world (Michael Shoebridge, The Strategist)

Foreign Minister Marise Payne and Defence Minister Peter Dutton’s flight path on the way to Washington for the annual AUSMIN meeting with their American counterparts provides an insight into Australia’s policy directions and relationships as we look to open up to the world over 2022.

Their trip took them to JakartaNew Delhi and Seoul, but interestingly flew through Vietnamese, Filipino and other Southeast Asian airspace, avoiding Chinese airspace by taking a long way around that can only have been deliberate.

A side leg to Tokyo and a fuel stop in Singapore were all that were missing to signal core trusted partnerships for Australia in the region in the twin eras of a prolonged Covid-19 pandemic and aggressive Chinese power.

Australia’s path for reopening to the world | The Strategist (aspistrategist.org.au)

Categorie
Australia/China

Australia must prepare as China’s coercive capabilities draw closer (Malcolm Davis, The Strategist)

In a recent Lowy Institute paper, the Center for New American Security’s Thomas Shugart warns that China is building up its military capacity to coerce Australia directly, particularly in the event of US strategic retrenchment from the Indo-Pacific region.

He suggests a scenario in which China is successful in taking Taiwan; Japan and South Korea, sensing the waning of US power, then choose to be ‘Finlandised’ under Beijing. With the US ejected from East Asia, China can then wield an implied threat or actual use of force to coerce others, including Australia, to accept Chinese hegemony.

Australia must prepare as China’s coercive capabilities draw closer | The Strategist (aspistrategist.org.au)

Categorie
Uncategorized

Ensuring the ADF can make a rapid transition to war (Emily Chapman, The Strategist)

In 2019, Exercise Talisman Sabre ended with an airdrop of 26 tonnes of humanitarian assistance into Shoalwater Bay Training Area. In 2021, the same location was used to open the biennial exercise with a multi-domain firepower demonstration, highlighting the Australian Defence Force’s ability to transition from humanitarian assistance and disaster relief to warfighting. Helping uphold the rules-based international order and protecting Australia from all threats will require the ADF to rapidly switch between such operations.

Ensuring the ADF can make a rapid transition to war | The Strategist (aspistrategist.org.au)

Categorie
Australia

New beginnings: Rethinking business and trade in an era of strategic clarity and rolling disruption (John Coyne, Gill Savage and Michael Shoebridge, ASPI)

This special report considers the relationship between our business and trade positioning in the context of the impacts of Covid, natural disasters and the actions of coercive trading partners.

Global economic integration has enabled the spread of ideas, products, people and investment at never before seen speed. International free trade has been a goal of policy-makers and academics for generations, allowing and fostering innovation and growth. We saw the mechanism shudder in 2008 when the movement of money faltered; the disruption brought about by COVID-19 has seen a much more multi-dimensional failure of the systems by which we share and move. The unstoppable conveyor belt of our global supply chain has ground to a halt. This time, what will we learn?

ASPI’s latest research identifies factors that have led to the erosion of Australia’s policy and planning capacity, while detailing the strengths of our national responses to recent crises. The authors recommend an overhaul of our current business and trade policy settings, with a view to building an ‘agenda that invests in what we’re good at and what we need, values what we have and builds the future we want.’

The authors examine the vulnerabilities in Australia’s national security, resilience and sovereignty in relation to supply chains and the intersection of the corporate sector and government. To protect Australia’s business interests and national sovereignty, the report highlights recent paradigm shifts in geopolitics, whereby economic and trade priorities are increasingly relevant to the national security discussion.

New beginnings: Rethinking business and trade in an era of strategic clarity and rolling disruption | Australian Strategic Policy Institute | ASPI

Page 2 of 22
1 2 3 4 22