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Russia

Will Russia ever leave fossil fuels behind? (Angelina Davydova, BBC)

The small West Siberian city of Khanty-Mansiysk, home to just over 100,000 people, is Russia’s unofficial capital of oil. The town is surrounded by some of the most extensive oilfields in the world, which shape not only the region’s geology but its economy and identity.

The relatively short history of oil in Khanty-Mansiysk has transformed this part of Russia. The Samotlor oil field, Russia’s largest, was discovered in the 1960s to the east of the city and fast became the source of the area’s considerable wealth. Khanty-Mansiysk sits within the Tyumen region, which often ranks second in Russia for wellbeing and socioeconomic development, after only Moscow.

Will Russia ever leave fossil fuels behind? – BBC Future

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Lebanon

Beirut blast: UN ignored plea for port disaster evidence (BBC)

The BBC has learned that the UN has repeatedly ignored requests from bereaved families for information to help the official investigation into the Beirut port explosion which killed 219 people in August last year.

The probe has been beset by delays, rows and recriminations, leaving families and survivors no closer to finding out who, if anyone, was to blame, as BBC Middle East correspondent Anna Foster reports.

Beirut blast: UN ignored plea for port disaster evidence – BBC News

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Sudan

Sudan’s military reinstates ousted civilian PM Hamdok (BBC)

Sudan’s ousted Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok has been reinstated following last month’s coup when he was put under house arrest.

Sudan’s military reinstates ousted civilian PM Hamdok – BBC News

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Afghanistan

Afghanistan: Taliban unveil new rules banning women in TV dramas (BBC)

Women have been banned from appearing in television dramas in Afghanistan under new rules imposed by the Taliban government.

Afghanistan: Taliban unveil new rules banning women in TV dramas – BBC News

Categorie
Intelligence

Somali spy agent death: Probe exonerates officials (BBC)

A team investigating the disappearance and subsequent death of a female Somali spy agent, Ikran Tahlil, has “found no evidence” that senior officials in the National Intelligence and Security Agency (Nisa) were culpable.

Tahlil, who worked in the cyber-security department of the Nisa, went missing in June.

Senior officials at the intelligence agency had been accused of having a hand in her disappearance and alleged death.

According to the state-owned Somali National TV Gen Abdullahi Bulle Kamey, who was leading the investigation, said the former Nisa chief Fahad Yasin and other officials had been interrogated and the team found no evidence that they were culpable.

Mr Kamey also said Nisa provided documents containing evidence that al-Shabab kidnapped Tahlil and killed her.

On 2 September, the spy agency reportedly said Tahlil was killed by al-Shabab after being abducted in Mogadishu. However, al-Shabab denied involvement in her disappearance and supposed death.

The handling of her case created a political rift between Prime Minister Mohamed Hussein Roble and President Mohamed Abdullahi Farmajo.