Categorie
Analysis

TechInnovation. China’s new regulation of platforms: a message for American policymakers (Tom Wheeler, Brookings)

At a time when the United States and its Western allies are struggling to determine the proper oversight of digital platform companies, the Chinese government is moving decisively ahead with its own plan. That China has designed regulations for these digital platform companies to stimulate competition and innovation should send a message to Western policymakers.

China’s new regulation of platforms: a message for American policymakers (brookings.edu)

Categorie
Uncategorized

Cities/SDGs. City playbook for advancing the SDGs (Brookings)

This “City Playbook for Advancing the SDGs” compiles a series of how-to briefs and case studies on advancing sustainable development and social progress locally. These short, digestible, and practical briefs are written by city government officials for other city officials, based on their direct experience.

City playbook for advancing the SDGs (brookings.edu)

Categorie
Analysis

TechInnovation. Enrollment algorithms are contributing to the crises of higher education (Alex Engler, Brookings)

Hundreds of higher education institutions are procuring algorithms that strategically allocate scholarships to convince more students to enroll. In doing so, these enrollment management algorithms help colleges vary the cost of attendance to students’ willingness to pay, a crucial aspect of competition in the higher education market. This paper elaborates on the specific two-stage process by which these algorithms first predict how likely prospective students are to enroll, and second help decide how to disburse scholarships to convince more of those prospective students to attend the college. These algorithms are valuable to colleges for institutional planning and financial stability, as well as to help reach their preferred financial, demographic, and scholastic outcomes for the incoming student body.

Enrollment algorithms are contributing to the crises of higher education (brookings.edu)

Categorie
Uncategorized

Israel. The game is not yet over, and vaccines still matter: Lessons from a study on Israel’s COVID-19 vaccination (Oren Heller, Yaniv Shlomo, Yung Chun, Mary Acri, and Michal Grinstein-Weiss, Brookings)

Just a few months ago, we almost sang a song of triumph in the fight against the pandemic. The infection numbers drastically decreased in countries with high vaccination rates. The Tokyo Olympic Games ended without a big outbreak. Many sports leagues resumed their activities, like Major League Baseball and the English Premier League. We dreamed of a world that was back to normal.

The game is not yet over, and vaccines still matter: Lessons from a study on Israel’s COVID-19 vaccination (brookings.edu)

Categorie
Uncategorized

USA. The vaccine divide will drive even worse economic divides (Mark Muro and John C. Austin, Brookings)

The impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic have been felt in a lot of different ways. Lower-wage workers have suffered far greater employment losses than high-wage workers, with employment slower to recover, as the W.E. Upjohn Institute found. Permanent job losses among Black workers have been almost twice those of white workers. Mothers have seen a much sharper decline in their labor force participation rate than fathers.

The vaccine divide will drive even worse economic divides (brookings.edu)

Categorie
Uncategorized

USA/Mexico/Canada. Developing a roadmap for USMCA success (Joshua P. Meltzer, Brookings)

The passage of the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA) through the U.S. Congress with overwhelming bipartisan support, as well as with strong political backing in Canada and Mexico, underscored the importance of USMCA for North American trade and economic relations.[1] It builds on the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and largely retains NAFTA’s commitment to lowering trade barriers although it rolls back trade openness in the auto sector. USMCA also adds robust new and timely commitments, particularly on digital trade, labor, and the environment.

Developing a roadmap for USMCA success (brookings.edu)

Categorie
Uncategorized

USA. Filibuster reform is coming—here’s how (Mel Barnes, Norman Eisen, Jeffrey A. Mandell, and Norman Ornstein, Brookings)

In the America of 2021, a seemingly unstoppable force has met an apparently immovable object. Across the nation, state officials are acting with brazen impunity in curtailing voting rights. At best nakedly partisan, and at worst openly racist, legislators are proposing and passing, and some governors are signing, statutes that will strip the ballot from millions, seize the power to overturn election outcomes those partisans don’t like, and potentially tilt the political playing field for decades to come.[1] No wonder President Biden has declared it the “most significant test of our democracy since the Civil War.”[2 ]

Filibuster reform is coming—here’s how (brookings.edu)

Categorie
Uncategorized

9/11. How 9/11 changed the policy world (Madiha Afzal, Scott R. Anderson, John Hudak, Elaine Kamarck, Suzanne Maloney, Bruce Riedel, and Fred Dews, Brookings)

Twenty years after the 9/11 attacks, six Brookings scholars reflect on their personal experiences of that terrible day, and offer expert insights into how 9/11 changed policy and what the anniversary suggests for policy moving forward.

How 9/11 changed the policy world

Categorie
Uncategorized

High-Tech Deterrence. “War is interested in you”: Balancing the promise and peril of high-tech deterrence (Melanie W. Sisson, Brookings)

Twenty years ago, I sat in a classroom on the Upper West Side of Manhattan with around 40 peers. We were concentration-shopping — the ritual through which students at Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs (SIPA) received presentations by faculty explaining the various courses of study available to them. This particular session was devoted to international security policy, and the content was being delivered by its then-director, the venerable Dick Betts. I remember very clearly watching Betts step behind the lectern to make the following statement with frank and unsentimental seriousness: “You may not be interested in war. But war is interested in you.” Some number of people tittered at what I presume they found to be the melodrama in the moment; the following Tuesday was September 11, 2001.

“War is interested in you”: Balancing the promise and peril of high-tech deterrence (brookings.edu)

Page 2 of 132
1 2 3 4 132