Categorie
Uncategorized

Technologies and religions at the risk of paradoxes (by Marco Emanuele)

Paradoxes generate risks. If we are in a global and globalized society (very different adjectives in terms of meaning), logic would like everyone to share openness as an essential condition. Open societies should prevail.

Well, that’s not the case. We live the paradox of a world in flames (not only from an environmental point of view but also from a political and economic ones, apart from the pandemic) and the “geostrategic actors” seem to be playing to protect themselves from the open sea of ​​planetary destiny.

One of the most dangerous characteristics of the present time is the return of nationalisms or, better said, the desire for self-sufficient closures. Whether it is done out of real or induced fear, or by tactical choice, nationalisms are the negation of the cultural and political value of the nation as an ineliminable identity of every people.

Two elements with a planetary dimension, such as religions and technological innovations, risk being dragged into the paradox of nationalisms. In doing so, both religions and technological innovations risk being placed at the service of the exasperation of closures within borders: as if our territory were not – in the third millennium – extended to the entire planet and, by now, to space.

Taking away global dimension from religions and technologies runs the risk of emptying them of meaning. Religions are very often exploited in the name of political reasons that would like to crystallize a mythical, fixed, inviolable reality; they would thus be religions without dialogue, rites to be followed slavishly in the name of an imposed political order.

Technologies, equally exploited, risk turning into mere instruments of geopolitical struggle: it is for technology, in fact, that new competitions are developed for new wars of power at the international level.

The reflection continues.

Categorie
Uncategorized

Cities/Technologies/Climate Change. Are Energy Clocks the Smart Way to Make Cities Cleaner? (Tony Blair Institute for Global Change)

Olamide Oguntoye

  • Cities trying to go cleaner by cutting emissions often find smart technologies –despite their huge potential benefits – challenging to implement and manage.
  • At the heart of the challenge lies the need to develop holistic data solutions to support smart technologies.
  • Energy clocks present an opportunity to address the gap. Energy clocks are dynamic open-access data systems which can unlock up to 12 per cent emission reduction while saving cities more than $100 billion in annual energy costs.
  • Cities must align incentives on energy clocks, recalibrate administrative institutions and create viable channels to turn data into impact.

Are Energy Clocks the Smart Way to Make Cities Cleaner? | Institute for Global Change

Categorie
Analysis

Productivity Growth/Technologies – How to solve the puzzle of missing productivity growth (Brookings)

Despite the economic damage wrought by the novel coronavirus over the past year, an analysis published by The Economist in December 2020 argues that the COVID-19 pandemic may have made a boom in productivity more likely to happen because “new technologies are clearly able to do more than has generally been asked of them.”

How to solve the puzzle of missing productivity growth

Categorie
Analysis

(Innovation/Technology) Fear and loathing of cryptocurrencies (ORF)

SHASHIDHAR K.J., SRINATH SRIDHARAN

Governments must realise that cryptocurrencies were created as a reaction to neoliberal policies and wholly strive to understand how the state can build better outcomes for citizens.

https://www.orfonline.org/expert-speak/fear-loathing-cryptocurrencies/

Categorie
Analysis

(Technologies) Robot census: Gathering data to improve policymaking on new technologies (Brookings)

Robert Seamans

Robot census: Gathering data to improve policymaking on new technologies

Categorie
Analysis

SOUTHEAST ASIA – Retooling Democratic Good Governance (Coby Goldberg and Kristine Lee, CNAS)

Online and offline, illiberal governance technologies are proliferating across Southeast Asia. From the strained democracies of Indonesia and the Philippines to the one-party electoral state of Singapore and the military-ruled kingdom of Thailand, Southeast Asian governments are harnessing emerging technologies to more effectively surveil and control their populations. As Chinese technology companies emerge as dominant players in Southeast Asian markets, both shaping and meeting the needs of consumers and their governments alike, the region as a whole is bending toward a less free and open future—one less hospitable to America’s long-term commercial interests and democratic values. Yet, instead of acting as a counter-balancing force for democratic governance in the region, American companies are acting as accelerants of trends toward illiberalism, and a future in which Southeast Asian governance resembles China. The controversies surrounding the 2020 American election and presidential transition, meanwhile, have undercut the credibility of the United States’ ideological messaging across the globe.

https://www.cnas.org/publications/commentary/retooling-democratic-good-governance